Natural nitrogen production: 1.5 per cent less global energy consumption

The introduction of nitrogen containing fertiliser in the 1860s has drastically improved crop yields. This not only increased the quantity of food that can be produced, but carbon uptake as well. But due to the high pressure and temperature requirements, … Continue reading

All-natural nano-sponge absorbs CO2

A new method of developing metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has made them completely environmentally friendly. They are not only capable of detecting, capturing and storing CO2, but are largely made of it as well. They are in fact so green that … Continue reading

Bionic bacterium to produce biofuels and drugs

A bionic bacterium, would that be the bacterial equivalent of the six million dollar man from the equally named 70’s tv show, with enhanced strength, speed and vision? Unfortunately the answer is no. With man-made amino acids in its DNA … Continue reading

Tequila plant agave seems excellent source of biofuel

The food versus fuel debate has put large-scale biofuel production in a squeeze in recent years, but competition with food crops is just one drawback for which biofuel crop production is criticised. So far each biofuel crop has shown to … Continue reading

Making batteries greener and better with algae

Existing batteries are not known for their environmentally friendly components, since most contain heavily toxic chemicals. The much used lithium-ion batteries, best known for their use in cell phones and electric cars, for instance can contain pollutants that may decrease … Continue reading

Hydrogen fuel produced from sunlight and safely stored

Hydrogen has long been commended as a clean and efficient alternative to gasoline, but so far it hasn’t really been able to live up to expectations. Mostly because it has to be derived from non-renewable sources like coal and natural … Continue reading

Recycled paper waste could be used to fuel cars

It seems a bit far-fetched, producing fuel out of paper waste with the help of bacteria found in animal droppings. But it is exactly what Tulane University scientists in New Orleans have done. They managed to use a novel bacterial … Continue reading